Is Alien Life Hiding in a Crater on Mars? Scientists make surprising discovery


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Scientists have identified numerous interesting features on Mars which indicate the planet hosted ‘Alien’ life.


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The Argyre basin on the red planet is believed to hold all the ingredients for organisms to have evolved on Mars.

Formed by an asteroid impact nearly 3.9 billion years ago, the Argyre basin on the red planet is believed to hold all the ingredients for organisms to have evolved on Mars.

According to new research, scientists have identified numerous interesting features on Mars which indicate the planet hosted ‘Alien’ life, while suggesting the red planet might still have ice hidden beneath the harsh surface.

The next step  –in order confirm the claims which were believed as simple rumours a couple of years ago–  is to send a new mission to the red planet.

The vast crater which was created by a huge impact around 3.9 billion years ago is, according to researchers, the best place we could search for life on the red planet. The ancient crater, which was named after the mythical silver island from Greek mythology, holds all of the necessary ingredients for life as we know it to develop on Mars, a new study concluded.

Researchers now want to send a new mission to mars targeting the crater located in the southern Martian hemisphere in order to hunt for signs of past or present life on Mars.

This discovery has ignited an intense debate among researchers and UFO believers which firmly believe Mars has, at least, microbial life present on its surface and underground cavities.

Scientists have identified what appear to be huge mounds of buried ice, ancient glacier deposits and the remains of  hydrothermal vents –that could have helped create the necessary conditions for life as we know it to develope– at the 1,770 kilometer-wide basin.

Writing in a paper published by the prestigious Journal Astrobiology, Dr. Alberto Fairen from Cornell University and his colleagues said: ‘The early post-impact environment of the Argyre basin possibly contained many of the ingredients that are thought to be necessary for life – abundant and long-lived liquid water, biogenic elements, and energy sources, all of which would have supported a regional environment favourable for the origin and the persistence of life.’

Dr. Fairen and his team examined evidence sent back by the numerous orbiters currently exploring Mars.


Gullies (pictured) and sediment in the Argyre basin are thought to be proof that liquid water once flowed and eroded the surface of Mars over a considerable period of time.
Gullies (pictured) and sediment in the Argyre basin are thought to be proof that liquid water once flowed and eroded the surface of Mars over a considerable period of time.

Scientists believe that for future Mars mission, the basin –which is the second deepest impact basin on Mars— would be an ideal landing spot for spacecraft since the long descent would allow the spacecraft to slow down before touching down on the surface of the red planet.

However, scientists added that since sunlight is relatively poor during the long winter months in the Argyre basin, future Mars mission would need to rely on Nuclear power, instead of solar energy.

In an interview with Space.com, Dr. Fairen said: ‘I would like to have a true life-searching payload to inspect the astrobiological promising features.

‘Argyre could be safeguarding the latest remains of an ancient Martian biosphere.’

In the paper published by the Journal Astrobiology, Dr. Fairen, and his team identified numerous features which indicate the Argyre basin had all the necessary conditions for life as we know it to develop.

According to previous studies, researchers have concluded that in the distant past, the red planet was much different than it is today. Around 3.9 billion years ago, Mars had giant oceans on its surface, with numerous rivers and lakes covering the planet’s surface. In addition to that, researchers discovered that the red planet had an atmosphere eerily similar to that of Earth. According to scientists, the slow destruction of our neighbor’s planet atmosphere was caused by “huge rope-like tendrils of magnetic rotations. The red planet’s once

The red planet’s once hospitable atmosphere was blown away over 4 billion years ago. The process of Mars losing its precious atmosphere most likely occurred over a period of several hundred million years. Scientists speculate that during this time, the red planet was hit by “extreme ultraviolet photons” from the sun. Before this happened, water was most likely abundant on the red planet and it is very likely that life as we know it could have developed on Mars. This means that when Mars was much younger, it was much warmer and wetter, meaning that it was a very good candidate for life to develop. Scientists believe that Mars’ oceans evaporated due to the planet’s thinning atmosphere which caused it to leak into space.


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