A 6,000 year old camp discovered near Stonehenge


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A group of archaeologists working near the famous monument of Stonehenge in the United Kingdom claim to have discovered a 6,000 year old camp that could potentially redefine the British history. The discovery was made at a site called Blick Mead, located just over two miles from Stonehenge.

Archaeologists said the latest carbon date suggested it was continuously occupied between 7500-4000 BC
Archaeologists said the latest carbon date suggested it was continuously occupied between 7500-4000 BC

Archaeologists state that the Charcoal dug from the site has been scientifically tested and reveals that it dates from around 4,000BC. David Jacques from the University of Buckingham, UK, is the person responsible for the discovery which was made in October. Evidence of possible structures has been found but more research is needed to confirm all theories. This discovery is of great importance as it is a untouched Mesolithic landscape in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

The archaeologists found burnt flints, remains of animals and tools
The archaeologists found burnt flints, remains of animals and tools

Jacques explained that during the excavation evidence of feasting was found as archaeologists found burnt flints, tools and remains of aurochs, eaten by early hunter gatherers. The natural spring present at Blick mead would have been a attraction for both people and animals. With this discovery, the British prehistory could be rewritten. Archaeologists David Jacques believes that this was the latest dated Mesolithic encampment ever found in the UK and Blick Mead site connects the early hunter gatherer groups returning to Britain after the Ice Age to the Stonehenge area all the way through to the Neolithic in the late 5th Millennium BC.

This archaeological discovery faces potential threats, Archaeologist David Jacques raised concerns about possible damage to the site over plans to build a road tunnel past Stonehenge. The Department of Transport on the other hand has stated that they would “consult before any building”.


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