Fairies: Nothing Like American Myths, Says Irish Farmer of Ancient Land


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In Ireland, stories about the fairies persist today. However, they aren’t like the fairies depicted in America at all. 🧚‍♂️ 🧚‍♀️

Rather than looking like the winged creatures of myth, Irish farmer Pat Noone says faires look like people. He’s seen them often playing music, drinking, and dancing. 

“The fairies [are] the very same as us. Not quite as tall,” he says. “They are not tall people. They’re dressed in green and red,” says Irish farmer Pat Noone. However, they may also change appearance, taking on the same height as observers.

Irish farmer Pat Noone talks about fairies, fairy, Green Hills Farm, Ireland
Pat Noone at the Green Hills Farm, Ireland. Screenshots via YouTube

The Aos Sí Fairy World

Speaking plain English or any other language you prefer, the aos sí (fairy world) members live an congregate.

At the Green Hills Farm in Kilconnell, Noone has been farming for 40 years. There, he has become well-known for his connection to the fairies on ancient sacred land. The 17-acre farm is the site of a fairy field and a porthole to another world.

“A lot of people come here to see the fairies in this field, and they get great experiences here.

“I have the porthole to the fairy world, where the blackthorn meets the whitethorn.”

Related: Who were the shining beings known as the Tuatha Dé Danann, said to once rule Ireland?

An Ancient Burial Site

Noone says that his farm was built on a “massive ley line,” where massive ancient stones were arranged. Noon estimate the megaliths could be 7,000 years old, but nobody can say for sure.

One of the standing stones he calls “the fertility stone,” which he says draws in people sensitive to energy fields.

“There is healing from the land,” Noone says. 

A large Bronze-age burial mound is the resting place of an ancient Chieftan. Noone estimates the burial took place two-and-a-half to three thousand years ago.

During construction of a railway on the farm, workers found seven halberds, ceremonial swords used by the Celts. After the sword’s discovery in 1840, the blades reside in a museum in London.

Healing Rituals

Not only does the land have a healing force, but the farmer also considers himself a healer. Using copper wire, he lowers it around volunteers.

“I can feel the weight of the wire lifting the bad energy off your body and freeing you up,” he says. 

Does he claim to cure illness? No, but instead says he can release healing energy in the body and third eye.

“I don’t proclaim to cure anything. You cure yourself, but I free up your mind, and I free up your body; and your third eye and all that, I release the energy. Everybody has good energy in their body,” he says.

On occasion, the farmer has been invited to America to perform healing rituals.

From AgriLand Irish farming news:

“A guy from America came in here two years ago; he was a Puritan; he wanted me to do land healings in America. I was flown out to America to do land healings on up through New England.

Further explaining,  he said “I do land healings for people that the land is cursed and has no luck – I will bring back the luck. I get photographs; people ring me from as far away as Scotland, Wales, and England if they’re doing land reclamation, or anything with land, to see if there’s fairy trees if they don’t want to disturb them.”

Keepers of the Sacred Land

Standing in sacred places on the land, Noone says there are portals to other worlds, which sometimes give visitors a sense of inner peace. For a generation, his family has been careful not to clear away whitethorn bushes, associated with the fairies. 

Even though clearing the ground would offer more grazing for cattle, the family leaves the bushes undisturbed.

“That’s the way it should be. They were keepers of the land; they kept the land sacred,” Noone says of his father’s refusal to touch the whitethorn bushes.

Pat Noone points out whitethorn bushes
Pat Noone points out whitethorn bushes – screenshot via YouTube

 Also, there are fairy trees, which visitors attach pieces of material as a “thank you or a wish to the fairies.” Now, he prefers to offer rushes because the trees were becoming totally covered in strands of cloth.

See Pat Noone discuss the fairies below from Ronan Kelly’s Ireland:

Serenity and Terror

In 2011, Noone’s brother was on the bottom floor of the Twin Towers on 9/11. During that frightening experience, he focused on an image of the serene farm and his brother at an old ash tree. Thinking of this, the memory helped him get through the terrorist attack.

When asked what kind of things people experience at Green Hills, Noone says:

“They have found a great peace here, a great peace of mind. That’s what they have found; they have found emotions,” says Noone. “They have found a lot of other things, but I won’t put it into your mind. You’ll have to come to experience it.”

Although many people report having a sense of peace, others have been scared out of their minds. Visitors to a “fairy fort” created near an old tree have attempted to stay the night.

However, during the night, they have left in terror, refusing to say what they experienced. Other places at the farm are off-limits, as it would upset the fairies to see campers or cutting down trees.

Fairy Tree at Green Hills Farm
Fairy Tree at Green Hills Farm, Ireland. Screenshot via YouTube

Encounters with Fairies

Noone himself describes occasional disorienting moments where he has lost all memory of where he is. Others driving along the road have forgotten where they are for a few moments, which he calls “the fairy stray,” a trance-like state.

“The old people used to say when you go out in a fairy field; you should bring a pocket of stones. Nobody ever knew what the pocket of stones was for,” says Noone. Now, he believes the stones were needed to throw at the ground. Otherwise, one could mistake a river for a road.

Although they may be tricksters on occasion, Noone claims they are also good and want to be respected. In some cases, one might ask for a favor. However, then, they will ask for one in return.

“I’ve never asked them because I’d be afraid what they’d ask me back,” he says. “You don’t know. They could ask for another life. It could be one for one, so you never ask for something that you don’t know anything about. I wouldn’t ask the fairies, but they have serious power.”

Related: Do descendants of the mysterious Green Children of Woolpit exist today?

See more from Pat Noone in the video from Lora O’Brien below:


Featured Image via Youtube


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