World’s oldest astronomical Observatory Predates Stonehenge and Pyramids


These rocks are thought to have once marked the sun's journey throughout the year. ABC: Hamish Fitzsimmons
These rocks are thought to have once marked the sun’s journey throughout the year. ABC: Hamish Fitzsimmons

It turns out that the world’s OLDEST astronomical Observatory Predates Stonehenge and Pyramids. Australian researchers have found that an ancient Aboriginal site in the Victorian bush could be the most ancient astronomical observatory on the surface of the planet, predating Stonehenge and even the Pyramids of Giza. According to experts, the site is around 11,000 years old.

The study of the Wurdi Youang stone arrangement has revealed that this ancient formation could be over 11,000 years old. This provides a lot of useful information as it tells us a lot about how aboriginal developed in Australia.  The Wurdi Youang stone arrangement, located some 45km west of Melbourne, was created over 11 thousand years ago, using some 90 blocks of basalt said a custodian, Reg Abrahams. The ancient site clearly identifies the equinox, the winter solstice, and the summer solstice.

Lead researchers in Indigenous Astronomy, Duane Hamacher, has worked closely with Aboriginal elders at the ancient site in order to reconstruct their knowledge about the cosmos.

“Some academics have referred to this stone arrangement here as Australia’s version of Stonehenge,” Dr. Hamacher said.

“I think the question we might have to ask is: is Stonehenge Britain’s version of Wurdi Youang? Because this could be much, much older.”

One of the most important things about the ancient observatory is the fact that it the site is around 11,000 years old, it technically rewrites history and disproves the idea that ancient  Australians were nomadic hunter-gatherers.

Through numerous discoveries of ancient sites around the globe, we are beginning to understand that tens of thousands of years ago, people living on Earth were far more sophisticated then we believe.

According to experts, the astronomical observatory in the Victorian bush was created precisely, so the ancients were able to map the movement of the Sun throughout the year.

Another important clue which indicates early Australian’s weren’t hunter-gatherers is the fact that experts have found around the observatory traces of semi-permanent villages which show evidence of early fishing and farming practices, points out Custodian Reg Abrahams.

“If you’re going to have a stone arrangement where you mark off the seasons throughout the year with the solstices and equinoxes, it kind of makes sense if you’re at least most of the year in one specific location to do that,” he said.

“So if that’s the case, it would make sense if you’re near permanent food and water sources.”

Experts say they have found places near the observatory where ‘eel traps’ were once set up and even signs of farming terraces.

“You see a lot of agricultural and aquacultural practices, so evidence of this agriculture may go back tens of thousands of years, pre-dating what anthropologists commonly think of as the dawn of agriculture which is about 11,000 years ago in Mesopotamia,” he said.

All of this has lead Dr. Hamacher to conclude early Australians possessed elaborate knowledge systems.

“They understand very well the motions of the sun, the moon, the planets and the stars throughout the year and over longer periods of time,” he said.

“White Australians don’t generally recognize that the history of colonialism has erased that, so what we’re doing is helping the communities piece that information back together by working with communities.”


Featured image by JackEavesArt


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