Government is Ignoring and Blocking UAP Report Efforts, Say Officials


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UAP Report June

In June, a public UAP report on unidentified aerial phenomena is due as requested by the Senate Intelligence Committee. However, multiple current and former government officials say military and spy agencies are “blocking or simply ignoring the effort,” reported POLITICO.

Sen. Marco Rubio requested the UAP report, which is required to provide “a detailed description” of all unidentified aerial phenomena reporting for the federal government, “regardless of which service or agency acquired the information.”

“We have things flying over our military bases and places where we’re conducting military exercises. We don’t know what it is and it isn’t ours,” Rubio told CBS last July.

Nevertheless, it seems the report will likely be incomplete, delayed, and highly redacted, similar to a recent CIA document dump.

Now, the Biden administration may decide to delay the report due to all the roadblocks.

Public Perception of a Coverup

In all likelihood, delaying the forthcoming report would only strengthen the public’s perception of a coverup.

“Any delay in delivering it is likely to be perceived by a large segment of the public as an attempt by the government to hide what it knows,” reported Bryan Bender.

Such perception would be entirely logical, given the long history of coverups, such as the decades of secret multimillion-dollar UFO study programs.

Also, recent public statements by Trump’s former Director of National Intelligence (DNI) John Ratcliffe make it clear there may be much more to cover up than we know.

For example, Ratcliffe said, “there are a lot more sightings” than the public is aware of.

Furthermore, Ratcliffe explained that U.S. military craft and satellites picked up aircraft moving with unknown technology, even breaking the sound barrier without a sonic boom.

Public Disclosure in the UAP Report?

Despite Rubio’s request, it’s plain that the Pentagon maintains the position that protecting national security takes precedence over public disclosure.

Thus, the Air Force deferred reporters’ questions to the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Then, Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough responded without addressing criticism:

“To protect our people, maintain operational security and safeguard intelligence methods, we do not publicly discuss the details of the UAP observations, the task force, or investigations,” said Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough.

From this statement, we can assume any report would redact UAP details.

Taking it Seriously

Already, Rubio has asked fellow lawmakers to take the report seriously on 60 Minutes.

“I want us to take it seriously and have a process to take it seriously,” Rubio said on the show.

Further, Rubio acknowledged a stigma about the subject.

“There’s a stigma on Capitol Hill,” Rubio said. “I mean, some of my colleagues are very interested in this topic and some kinda, you know, giggle when you bring it up. But I don’t think we can allow the stigma to keep us from having an answer to a very fundamental question.”

Now, consider that some in Congress may giggle at the mere mention of UFOs and that the report will almost certainly be incomplete. As for us, we gave up a long time ago on seeing many in Congress take issues seriously.

Former Pentagon Intelligence, Christopher Mellon

According to former deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence Christopher Mellon, the Air Force has denied access to information. Also, a Navy-led Pentagon task force set up last August has few personnel or resources to gather any evidence.

Further, government bureaucracies are stymying the efforts, as one would expect.

“I know that the task force has been denied access to pertinent information by the Air Force and they have been stiff-armed by them,” Mellon said in an interview. “That is disappointing but not unexpected.”

On the other hand, Mellon notes that, in contrast, the “tide is turning against the illogical stigma” preventing objective UAP study. 

Former AATIP Leader Lue Elizondo

Whistleblower and former AATIP leader Luis “Lue” Elizondo, who now works with Mellon and other former high-level officials at To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences, says delaying the June UAP report might be the best outcome. 

Instead, an interim report using more time and resources would serve the public better.

“We can do this right or we can do it right now,” Elizondo said. “It’s certainly not sufficient time to provide a comprehensive, government-wide report that Congress not only expects, but that Congress deserves and frankly, so does the American people,” he added.

Recently, Elizondo tweeted that he does not think the recent sightings could be attributed only to drones.

“Drones? In some cases, most certainly yes. In other cases, absolutely not. It is for this precise reason why we need a well-funded and enduring capability to collect, analyze and determine the exact nature of these things. It is here, it is real, and it is now,” he tweeted.

 In a 60 Minutes interview, Elizondo says that while the government has confirmed the UFOs are real, it has also been covering up the truth.

See Elizondo in the clip from Inside Edition:

Decades of Stigma and Secrecy

Even as decades of stigma and ridicule are giving way to mainstream UFO acceptance, it’s clear that full disclosure at this time would be extremely unlikely.

Already, we can see that the June UAP report will withhold much from the public. As Mellon said, even getting government agencies to agree on the language used will prove challenging.

 “In addition to the onerous job of trying to get everyone to come clean,” Mellon said, “there will be a sensitive and probably difficult process of getting all the players … to agree on the language and approve it. That process alone could take weeks or months.”

Therefore, we can all plan to continue searching for the truth after the UAP report comes out. In all likelihood, the prevailing attitudes of stigma and secrecy will not just vanish like a UFO.

Indeed, these attitudes were carefully cultivated for decades to discourage interest in the subject. For an in-depth analysis of how it was done, see the recent piece by Gideon Lewis-Kraus in the New Yorker.)

Public Interest Only Growing

On the other hand, now that the government has disclosed that UFOs are authentic, interest is only going to grow from there. As public interest grows, we could be more likely to see the disclosure about UFO origins.

Perhaps, one day, we’ll even learn about extraterrestrials?

For those interested, Mellon recommended the new “explosive documentary,” called The Phenomenon.

“I can’t think of a better way for people to begin educating themselves on the #UAP issue. The film provides a badly needed remedy for the unwarranted stigma that has prevented government & academia from taking this important topic seriously,” he tweeted.

The film touts itself as “the most credible film ever made about the global mystery involving unidentified aerial phenomenon.”

In the documentary trailer, Mellon states, “We need to accept that we are not alone in the universe.”


Featured image: Screenshot via YouTube


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