10 Incredible ancient cities of the world


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10 Incredible ancient cities of the world

From the remains of the ancient city of Egypt and other parts of Africa to the lost Roman metropolises or incredible Mayan centers in the Americas, we find hundreds of cities that are marvels of constructions and design. Here we list of ten ancient cities of the world worth knowing about:

1) Tiwanaku

The Gateway of the Sun from the Tiwanku civilization in Bolivia
The Gateway of the Sun from the Tiwanku civilization in Bolivia

Tiwanaku is a Pre-Columbian archaeological site in western Bolivia, South America. It is the capital of an empire that extended into present-day Peru and Chile, flourishing from AD 300 to 1000. The site was first recorded in written history by Spanish conquistador Pedro Cieza de León. He came upon the remains of Tiwanaku in 1549 while searching for the Inca capital Qullasuyu. Tiwanaku is significant in Inca traditions because it is believed to be the site where the world was created.

2) Tikal

The Tikal Temple I rises 47 metres (154 ft) high.
The Tikal Temple I rises 47 metres (154 ft) high.

Tikal was a thriving settlement, a political centre and according to scholars the capital of its region. Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 to 900 AD. During this time, the city dominated much of the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily, while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica such as the great metropolis of Teotihuacan in the distant Valley of Mexico.

3) Saqqara

Saqqara pyramid of Djoser in Egypt
Saqqara pyramid of Djoser in Egypt

Saqqara was the burial place of the city of Memphis, the capital of Ancient Egypt founded in 3000 BC by Menes. Saqqara features numerous pyramids, including the world famous Step pyramid of Djoser,. During routine excavations in 2011 at the dog catacomb in Saqqara necropolis, an excavation team led by Salima Ikram, and an international team of researchers led by Paul Nicholson of Cardiff University, uncovered almost eight million animal mummies at the burial site. It is thought that the mummified animals, mostly dogs, were intended to pass on prayers of their owners to their Gods

4)  Machu Picchu

The Macchu Picchu, a UNESCO World Heritage Site near Cusco in Peru, at twilight
The Macchu Picchu, a UNESCO World Heritage Site near Cusco in Peru, at twilight

One of the best known ancient cities of the world, and a staple of many tours of ancient cities, Machu Picchu is one of the best preserved Inca sites, located in modern Peru. Machu Picchu was built around 1450, at the height of the Inca Empire. The city  was built in the classical Inca style, with polished dry-stone walls. Its three primary structures are the Inti Watana, the Temple of the Sun, and the Room of the Three Windows. These are located in what is known by archaeologists as the Sacred District of Machu Picchu.

5) Teotihuacan

The view from the Pyramid of the Sun
The view from the Pyramid of the Sun

35 miles northeast of Mexico City, in a highlands plateau, lies the enormous archaeological site of the ancient city of Teotihuacan. Established around 100 B.C., and lasting until its fall between the seventh and eighth centuries, Teotihuacan was one of the largest cities in the ancient world, with over 150,000 inhabitants at its peak. According to archaeologists the advanced design of Teotihuacan suggests that ancient builders had knowledge, not only of architecture, but of complex mathematical and astronomical sciences, and one of the things that is just incredibly amazing and different from all other ancient sites is the fact that from the air, Teotihuacan‘s city layout strangely resembles a computer circuit board with two large processor chips– the Sun Pyramid and the Moon Pyramid. Researchers have also found numerous and remarkable similarities to the Great Pyramids of Egypt.

6) Baalbek

Temple of Bacchus
Temple of Bacchus

Baalbeck is a town in the Beqaa Valley of Lebanon situated east of the Litani River. Known as Heliopolis during the period of Roman rule, it was one of the largest sanctuaries in the empire and contains some of the best preserved Roman ruins in Lebanon.It is home to the largest Roman temple ever built, as well as a range of other magnificent ancient structures. There is also evidence of Baalbek’s time beyond the Romans. The history of settlement in the area of Baalbeck dates back about 9,000 years.

7) Chichen Itza 

El Castillo (pyramidd of Kukulcán) in Chichén Itzá
El Castillo (pyramidd of Kukulcán) in Chichén Itzá

Chichen Itza was a large pre-Columbian city built by the Maya people of the Terminal Classic. The archaeological site is located in the municipality of Tinum, in the Mexican state of Yucatán. Chichen Itza was one of the largest Maya cities and it was likely to have been one of the mythical great cities referred to in later Mesoamerican literature. The city may have had the most diverse population in the Maya world. Chichen Itza was conquered by the Toltec King of Tula in the 10th century AD, accounting for the fusion in Maya and Toltec influences.

8) Sparta

The ruins of Sparta
The ruins of Sparta

Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and left not only a mark in our historic records. Sparta was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece, situated on the banks of the Eurotas River in Laconia, in south-eastern Peloponnese. It emerged as a political entity around the 10th century BC. Given its military pre-eminence, Sparta was recognized as the overall leader of the combined Greek forces during the Greco-Persian Wars. Between 431 and 404 BC, Sparta was the principal enemy of Athens during the Peloponnesian War, from which it emerged victorious, though at great cost. Around 650 BC, it rose to become the dominant military land-power in ancient Greece.

9) Troy

Walls of Troy, Hisarlik, Turkey
Walls of Troy, Hisarlik, Turkey

Troy or “Truva” is one of the most famous and historically significant sites in the world. Located in modern day Turkey, the site marks the meeting place of Anatolia, the Aegean and the Balkans.  It is best known for being the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle and especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Troia was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1998.

10) Mohenjo Daro

A city-settlement of the the Indus Valley Civilization, ca. 2600-1500 BCE.
A city-settlement of the the Indus Valley Civilization, ca. 2600-1500 BCE.

Mohenjo Daro is an archeological site in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Built around 2600 BCE, it was one of the largest settlements of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, and one of the world’s earliest major urban settlements, contemporaneous with the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Crete. Mohenjo-daro was abandoned in the 19th century BCE, and was not rediscovered until 1922. The ruins of the city remained undocumented for over 3,700 years, until their discovery in 1922. According to some researchers, a nuclear blast occurred at Mohenjo Daro.

That was our list, let us know what your favorites are!

by Ancient Code

 


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