Rock inscriptions and Sphinx discovered at Gebel El Silsila


As a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, this site may earn from qualifying purchases. We may also earn commissions on purchases from other retail websites.

Gebel El Silsila discovery. Image  by Luxor Times
Gebel El Silsila discovery. Image by Luxor Times

Archaeologists have discovered rock inscriptions portraying the rare transfer of two obelisks from a quarry have been unearthed at Gebel el Silsila, according to The Cairo Post.

This discovery was made possible thanks to the Gebel el Silsila Survey Project which is an epigraphic survey mission from the Lund University of Sweden active on the site since early 2014.

“The work technique shows a notable cooperation among the workers and the workshops at the quarry. The scenes of the rocks, which were precisely cut, confirm the advanced skills of ancient Egyptian labor,” Director General of Aswan Antiquities Department Nasr Salama said.

“The project basically aims to document Gebel el Silsila’s epigraphic material in order to develop a database, catalogue and a topographic map for the site to have a better understanding of the area, its ancient visitors and what function and meaning the quarry marks had. The project also focuses on quarry marks and textual inscriptions carved upon the sandstone quarry faces,” said Nilsson.

Gebel el-Silsila or also referred to as Gebel Silsileh is located 65 km north of Aswan, the location where the cliffs on both sides of the Nile narrow. It was used as a quarry site from at least the 18th Dynasty to Greco-Roman times.

10834860_762993163773420_1121005169626545136_o

Scholars have discovered several depictions of the phases and techniques used for detaching blocks loading them in ancient sailing boats and shipping them to their respective locations through the River Nile. Several rock shelters and a small Sphinx similar to those aligned at the Sphinx avenue connecting between Luxor and Karnak temple was also discovered at the site according to Dr. Maria Nilsson, director of the Gebel el Silsila Survey Project.


Image Credit: Gebel el Silsila Epigraphic Survey Project

 


Like it? Share with your friends!

3 Comments

  1. See how the Sphinx is headless ?

    Perhaps the Giza Sphinx was also headless and a head was fused on to the body and then later re-carved.

    1. It actually matches the sphinx if you would carve a head out of the left over and work with it a little

Comments are closed.