Evidence points that the Vikings reached America before Columbus


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Archaeologist Patricia Sutherland (orange jacket) excavates a potential Viking site on Baffin Island. PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID COVENTRY, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Archaeologist Patricia Sutherland (orange jacket) excavates a potential Viking site on Baffin Island.
PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID COVENTRY, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Researchers have found evidence that America was “discovered” by the Vikings, and not by the Genoese sailor Christopher Columbus. That is what at least several archaeologists from Michigan State University state after finding the remains of several artifacts which they believe belonged to the mighty Vikings, in the south of the island of Buffin (located in the arctic part of Canada).

According to the journal “Sci News”, the discovery was made in an open excavation that actually began in 1960. Over 50 years later, researchers have discovered what they claim, is a melting pot used to melt several elements such as bronze. Even though more tests are needed to confirm these theories accurately, this device could be dated between the VIII and XIV which would corroborate the discovery of America before the Columbus era.

Archaeologists have long known that the Viking set sail towards the New World around A.D. 1000. A popular Icelandic saga tells of the exploits of Leif Eriksson, a Viking chieftain from Greenland who sailed westward to seek his fortune. According to the saga, Eriksson stopped long enough on Baffin Island to walk the coast—named Helluland.

Important discoveries were made in the 1960’s regarding the Vikings and the Americas, when two Norwegian researchers, Helge Ingstad and Anne Stine Ingstad, discovered and excavated the Viking base camp at L’Anse aux Meadows located in Newfoundland, the first confirmed Viking outpost in the Americas. The Viking outpost, dating back to A.D. 989 – 1020 boasted three Viking halls, as well as an assortment of huts for weaving, ironworking, and ship repair.


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