Floating Robot Aboard International Space Station goes Rogue


There’s a creepy robot currently orbiting the Earth onboard the International Space station. If the floating robot wasn’t creepy alone by its looks, it has now been reported the machine has gone rogue, starring to ignore human commands and acting strangely.

Image Credit: ESA / YouTube.

The ball-shaped flying brain robot called Cimon has a ‘permanent’ smile drawn on its face and answers to orders in a rather malevolent voice.

‘Cimon’ stands for Crew Interactive Mobile Companion.

It is definitely not the robot you’d want to be stuck while orbiting the planet at an altitude of more than 400 kilometers.

A recently published video posted by the European Space Agency has shown how the machine has gone rogue, refusing to obey instructions given to it by European Astronaut Alexander Gerst.

It seems that Cimon is in love with music. The first problem supposedly arose as the creepy floating brain decided not to snap out of music mode, after playing a song by Kraftwerk.

Furthermore, astronauts aboard the International Space Station have reported that the creepy machine has declined to float in the correct position.

The robot was programmed to float near the station’s floor, but for some reason, it has decided to occupy the middle of the cabin.

Image Credit: ESA / YouTube.

Gerst has tried to get the robot to play along. When Gerst issues a command telling Cimon to get into position, the creepy machine answers “Be nice please.”

It goes on to ask Gerst a question: “Don’t you like it here with me?”

And adds “Don’t be so mean.”

Here is the video posted by the European Space Agency:

The first thing I thought of when I saw the video posted by the European Space Agency was HAL 9000 from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, and how the Rogue AI says: “Sorry Dave, I cannot do that.”

Creepy, Creepy.

Luckily, unlike HAL 9000 from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, Cimon doesn’t actually control any of the International Space Station’s Systems.

If it actually did control systems of importance, we’d probably be thinking about how to get the astronauts back to Earth safely.

The creepy free-floating robot has an AI Brain.

Cimon is a 3D-printed plastic sphere designed to test human-machine interaction in space. Developed and built by Airbus in Friedrichshafen and Bremen, Germany, on behalf of German Space Agency DLR, Cimon uses artificial intelligence software by IBM Watson.

The machine is best suited for Gerst, but it doesn’t mean it cannot assist the other astronauts on board the ISS.


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4 Comments

  1. Could be this rouge AI the one who did the “sabotage” on the Russian spot a few months ago?

    I would’nt be surprised if so, after all, AIs do not need oxygen, only pity humans do.

    And yet goberments tink that unrestricted AI development is a good thing.

  2. Ai can be used safely. Not sure why people always dis ai. It will take time to streamline to make it better and safer. Plus if ai goes rogue in the future. You could use ai against ai.

    1. “..can be used safetly..” but thats not the way they are using it, simply because there are no rules, no regulations, no controls at all.

      What is a mad developper (and you know there are lots of mad people in the world) decides to built an IA capable of destroying all our financial infrastructure, just because he can and he hates rich people. Who will stop him from doing it?

      All im saying is this:
      IA development needs goberment regultaions and controls, NOW! before its too late.

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